Early Australian Distributors.

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Hugz
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Re: Early Australian Distributors.

Post by Hugz »

Looks like a Victa wind up and push to release type flywheel spinner. I thought they where peculiar to Australia?
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AusAnzani
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Re: Early Australian Distributors.

Post by AusAnzani »

I am loving all of these early adverts Hugz, please keep them coming. 8)
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Re: Early Australian Distributors.

Post by AusAnzani »

Image

This one has got my attention as I've not been able to find any adverts/info for the Sea hawk previously.

To me it looks like a rebadged Tas.

Any thoughts/comments?
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Hugz
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Re: Early Australian Distributors.

Post by Hugz »

The same advert appeared a few times. I'll keep and eye out for any changes to the advert for The Seahawk. It is about half the price of the Pilot or forty.
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Hugz
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Re: Early Australian Distributors.

Post by Hugz »

If you have a look at the Yamaha advert it says it can run on kerosene or petrol yet there is a price difference depending on which one you want to run on. Re-jetted carb? And in 1968 where was the market for kerosene? The war years had long gone (apart from Nam).
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AusAnzani
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Re: Early Australian Distributors.

Post by AusAnzani »

Interesting!

A while back a bloke told me about a 50's or 60's Eninrude he had that supposedly run on Kero.

I responded "mate, I reckon you've been sniffing the stuff"

Maybe he was right :oops:

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S
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Hugz
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Re: Early Australian Distributors.

Post by Hugz »

I believe the SD's could be run on Paraffin. It was discussed on here years ago.

From Wik Kerosene, also known as lamp oil, is a combustible hydrocarbon liquid widely used as a fuel in industry and households. Its name derives from Greek: κηρός (keros) meaning wax, and was registered as a trademark by Abraham Gesner in 1854 before evolving into a genericized trademark. It is sometimes spelled kerosine in scientific and industrial usage.[1] The term "kerosene" is common in much of India, Canada, the United States, Argentina, Australia and New Zealand.[2][3]

Kerosene is usually called paraffin in the United Kingdom, Southeast Asia, East Africa and South Africa.[4] A more viscous paraffin oil is used as a laxative. A waxy solid extracted from petroleum is called paraffin wax.

Kerosene is widely used to power jet engines of aircraft (jet fuel) and some rocket engines, and is also commonly used as a cooking and lighting fuel and for fire toys such as poi. In parts of Asia, where the price of kerosene is subsidized, it fuels outboard motors on small fishing boats.[5] World total kerosene consumption for all purposes is equivalent to about 1.2 million barrels per day.[6]

To prevent confusion between kerosene and the much more flammable and volatile gasoline, some jurisdictions regulate markings or colorings for containers used to store or dispense kerosene. For example, in the United States, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania requires that portable containers used at retail service stations be colored blue, as opposed to red (for gasoline) or yellow (for Diesel fuel).[7]
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Hugz
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Re: Early Australian Distributors.

Post by Hugz »

Here is an interesting article: http://www.smokstak.com/library/technic ... engine-23/

I wonder if this is why the SD had the fuel line next to the exhaust as kero needs to be hot to vaporize and burn. Also according to the article the compression needs to be lower. Are the short water jacket blocks lower in compression than the later ones. Also I'm sure we have seen a split tank before now to start on petrol and changeover to kero when warmed up. Transporting kero would be safer then petrol which could be another considerations in war conditions.

Another myth has started :cry:
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Collector Inspector
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Re: Early Australian Distributors.

Post by Collector Inspector »

Kerosene mixed with oil as a lubricant for a two stroke.............I am doubtful it would be wise.

During hard yard times four stroke motors were run on kero and yes some were made for that of course.

A Gull though?????

BnS
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Hugz
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Re: Early Australian Distributors.

Post by Hugz »

Were not all Yamaha's two stroke?
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Charles uk
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Re: Early Australian Distributors.

Post by Charles uk »

Kingfishers were sold around Asia that were designed to run on Kero, started & stopped on petrol.

Kero has some lubricating properties, but would probably require an oil addition, I've read about them somewhere during our Seagull researching & seem to remember them having a twin float chamber carb.

Does anyone have an early copy of the "British Seagull Service Manual for QB series Machines, Service sheet 10, Operating with Kerosine Fuel?
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Hugz
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Re: Early Australian Distributors.

Post by Hugz »

I'm still interested about the compression difference between long and short 102 water jackets. Jon, do you have the factory specs on this? Appreciate your input.
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Re: Early Australian Distributors.

Post by headdownarseup »

I can only offer what i've found by working on several 102's that i have to hand.

Compression as far as can be measured by conventional means is virtually no different between the short water jacket types and the long water jacket types. As a ball park figure in the region of 50 (ish) PSI.
Most of the newer type 40 series engines after "little model 40's" are considerably higher up to approx. 90+ psi if it's a good one, but generally speaking 70 is still quite good for a running motor.
I now have several 102's of most ages from SD's & SDP's to very early post war variants and beyond up to around the mid 60's. Pretty much all of them that i've rebuilt seem to churn out about 50 odd PSI thereabouts. Some of them seem to be quite stiff to turn the flywheel by hand, or what Bruce describes as "bouncy". :P
What they were like when they were new is perhaps better directed at uncle Chas.

Hope this helps

Jon
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Rob Ripley
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Re: Early Australian Distributors.

Post by Rob Ripley »

found in the Newcastle Morning Herald, 1949[attachment=0]1949 seagull advert.jpg[/attachment]
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Re: Early Australian Distributors.

Post by AusOB_Collector »

Too many Seagulls to count now!


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